Thursday, February 12, 2009

UTDB to launch a quarterly newsletter to promote tourism in the state

To promote tourism in the state, Uttarakhand Tourism Development Board (UTDB) has decided to launch a quarterly newsletter by end of this month. It is planning to launch the newsletter prior to the announcement of elections in the state. According to K. P. Sharma, Chairman, IATO Uttarakhand Chapter, who is also the editorial member of the upcoming newsletter, the main objective of bringing out the newsletter is to promote tourism in the state. It will focus on revealing achievement of UTDB in the past and present, as well as information about various tourism products in the state. It will also introduce a new district and new destinations in Uttarakhand with every issue of the newsletter.

For active tourism promotion in the state, UTDB will send this newsletter to tour operators across the state and foreign missions in India. According to Sharma, currently in Uttarakhand, Kumaon Mandal Vikas Nigam (KMVN) is promoting Adhi Kailash in a big way. It is a trekking route located partly in the Kailash Mansarovar direction. This place is known with the name of legendary characters of Great Mahabharatha,
Source;http://www.travelbizmonitor.com/utdb-to-launch-a-quarterly-newsletter-to-promote-tourism-in-the-state-5082

Yamunotri temple


Yamunotri, the source of the Yamuna River and the seat of the Goddess Yamuna, is one of the four sites in India's Char Dham pilgrimage.

The Yamunotri temple is located in Uttarakhand, India, a full day's journey from Uttarakhand's main towns — Rishikesh, Haridwar or Dehradun. The actual temple is only accessible by a six kilometer walk from the town of Hanuman Chatti and a four kilometer walk from Janki Chatti; horses or palanquins are available for rent. The hike from Hanuman Chatti to Yamunotri is very picturesque with beautiful views of a number of waterfalls. The original temple was built by Maharani Gularia of Jaipur in the 19th century. The current temple is of recent origin as past iterations have been destroyed by the weather and elements. Lodging at the temple itself is limited to a few small ashrams and guest-houses. Ritual duties such as the making and distribution of prasad (sanctified offerings) and the supervision of pujas (ritual venerations) are performed by the Uniyal family of pujaris (priests). Unique aspects of ritual practice at the site include hot springs where raw rice is cooked and made into prasad. It is located at an altitude of 3,235 metres approximately. A little ahead is the actual source of the river Yamuna which is at an altitude of about 4,421 metres approximately. Hot springs are also present offering relief to tired hikers.

There seems to be a confusion about who built the temple of Yamunotri. According to the website [uttarkashi.nic.in/Yamunotri.htm], the temple was originally constructed by Maharaj Pratap Shah of Tehri Garhwal.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yamunotri

Yamunotri temple


Yamunotri, the source of the Yamuna River and the seat of the Goddess Yamuna, is one of the four sites in India's Char Dham pilgrimage.

The Yamunotri temple is located in Uttarakhand, India, a full day's journey from Uttarakhand's main towns — Rishikesh, Haridwar or Dehradun. The actual temple is only accessible by a six kilometer walk from the town of Hanuman Chatti and a four kilometer walk from Janki Chatti; horses or palanquins are available for rent. The hike from Hanuman Chatti to Yamunotri is very picturesque with beautiful views of a number of waterfalls. The original temple was built by Maharani Gularia of Jaipur in the 19th century. The current temple is of recent origin as past iterations have been destroyed by the weather and elements. Lodging at the temple itself is limited to a few small ashrams and guest-houses. Ritual duties such as the making and distribution of prasad (sanctified offerings) and the supervision of pujas (ritual venerations) are performed by the Uniyal family of pujaris (priests). Unique aspects of ritual practice at the site include hot springs where raw rice is cooked and made into prasad. It is located at an altitude of 3,235 metres approximately. A little ahead is the actual source of the river Yamuna which is at an altitude of about 4,421 metres approximately. Hot springs are also present offering relief to tired hikers.

There seems to be a confusion about who built the temple of Yamunotri. According to the website [uttarkashi.nic.in/Yamunotri.htm], the temple was originally constructed by Maharaj Pratap Shah of Tehri Garhwal.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yamunotri

Yamunotri


Yamunotri
Altitude : 3165 mts
Climate : Summer-Cool during the dayy and cold at night.
Winter - Snow bound. Touching sub-zero.
Clothing : April to July - Light woollens
Language : Hindi, Garhwali & English

The Sacred Origin Of the Yamuna
The Garhwal Himalayas have been blessed with some of the holiest Hindu pilgrimage sites and Yamunotri is one such. One of the Char Dhams according to Hindu mythology, Yamunotri is the origin of the sacred river Yamuna. Famous for its thermal springs and glaciers, it is one of the most important stopovers on the itinerary of the Hindu pilgrim. According to an old legend, Asit Muni, the revered sage, used to reside here.

Location and Climate
Perched at an altitude of 3293 meters above sea level, Yamunotri is located in the Uttarkashi district of the northern state of Uttar Pradesh. It is very close to the Indo-Chinese border and is surrounded by the Himalayan offshoots on all sides. Yamunotri, lies near the Bandarpunch Mountain, which is 6315 m high and lies to the north. The glacial lake of Saptarishi Kund, on the Kalind Parbat, at an altitude of 4421 m, is the real source of the Yamuna River. Yamunotri is at a distance of 278 km from Dehradun, 236 km from Rishikesh, 176 km from Chamba, and 21 km from Sanya Chatti. It remains cool even during summers. The winters are snow-bound and temperatures fall below 0°C. One is advised to carry light or heavy woolens depending on the time of visit.

The first stopover for the Char Dham Yatra is the westernmost shrine of Yamunotri in the Garhwal Himalayas. Dedicated to Goddess Yamuna, it is perched atop a flank of the Bandar Poonchh peak (3165 mts. above sea level) and is situated opposite to Gangotri. The shrine attracts devotees in large numbers from May to October.

Yamunotri is the source of the revered river Yamuna which originates from the Champassar Glacier lying 1 km ahead of the shrine, at an altitude of 4421 mts. Pilgrims do not frequently visit the source of the river as it is not easily accessible.

Yamunotri finds a special mention in the Hindu mythology. According to a legend, this secluded hilly spot was the home of an ancient sage, Asit Muni.

Among the major attractions of Yamunotri are hot water springs nearby. Devotees prepare rice and potatoes to offer at the shrine, by dipping them in these hot water springs, tied in muslin cloth.

The trek to Yamunotri is spectacular, dominated by a panorama of rugged peaks and dense forests.

From Rishikesh, a 213 kms. journey by road takes one to Hanumanchatti. From here, the remaining 13 kms. trek is covered on foot or on ponies. Palanquins and Porters are also available on hire.


Prime Pilgrimage Attractions
Yamunotri Temple
The main temple is dedicated to Goddess Yamuna. The present temple was built by Maharani Guleria of Jaipur in the late nineteenth century. Once destroyed by an earthquake, it has been rebuilt. A holy dip in the nearby tank filled by hot springs and cooking rice in its water are common rituals performed by the devotees.

Surya Kund
One of the important thermal springs known for its very high temperature of 190°F. Pilgrims cook rice and potatoes here to offer to the deity in the temple.

Divya Shila
A huge rock pillar venerated before entering the Yamunotri Temple.

Hanumanchatti
The confluence of Hanuman Ganga and Yamuna rivers forms the starting point for the scenic Dodi TaL Trek.

Sayanachatti
A scenic spot along the banks of river Yamuna that makes a lovely sight enroute the trek upto Yamunotri.

Chamba
A sylvan spot on way to Tehri that offers an excellent view of the Himalayan peaks. Situated at an altitude of 1,676 mts., Chamba is an ideal summer retreat.

Accessibility
Airport
Jolly Grant, 196 kms. from Yamunotri via Dehradun
Rail
Rishikesh, 213 kms. & Dehradun, 172 kms.
Road
Dharasu, 107 kms. Tehri, 149 kms. Rishikesh, 213 kms.& Dehradun, 172 kms

Source: http://www.pilgrimage-india.com/chardham/yamunotri.html

Yamunotri


Yamunotri
Altitude : 3165 mts
Climate : Summer-Cool during the dayy and cold at night.
Winter - Snow bound. Touching sub-zero.
Clothing : April to July - Light woollens
Language : Hindi, Garhwali & English

The Sacred Origin Of the Yamuna
The Garhwal Himalayas have been blessed with some of the holiest Hindu pilgrimage sites and Yamunotri is one such. One of the Char Dhams according to Hindu mythology, Yamunotri is the origin of the sacred river Yamuna. Famous for its thermal springs and glaciers, it is one of the most important stopovers on the itinerary of the Hindu pilgrim. According to an old legend, Asit Muni, the revered sage, used to reside here.

Location and Climate
Perched at an altitude of 3293 meters above sea level, Yamunotri is located in the Uttarkashi district of the northern state of Uttar Pradesh. It is very close to the Indo-Chinese border and is surrounded by the Himalayan offshoots on all sides. Yamunotri, lies near the Bandarpunch Mountain, which is 6315 m high and lies to the north. The glacial lake of Saptarishi Kund, on the Kalind Parbat, at an altitude of 4421 m, is the real source of the Yamuna River. Yamunotri is at a distance of 278 km from Dehradun, 236 km from Rishikesh, 176 km from Chamba, and 21 km from Sanya Chatti. It remains cool even during summers. The winters are snow-bound and temperatures fall below 0°C. One is advised to carry light or heavy woolens depending on the time of visit.

The first stopover for the Char Dham Yatra is the westernmost shrine of Yamunotri in the Garhwal Himalayas. Dedicated to Goddess Yamuna, it is perched atop a flank of the Bandar Poonchh peak (3165 mts. above sea level) and is situated opposite to Gangotri. The shrine attracts devotees in large numbers from May to October.

Yamunotri is the source of the revered river Yamuna which originates from the Champassar Glacier lying 1 km ahead of the shrine, at an altitude of 4421 mts. Pilgrims do not frequently visit the source of the river as it is not easily accessible.

Yamunotri finds a special mention in the Hindu mythology. According to a legend, this secluded hilly spot was the home of an ancient sage, Asit Muni.

Among the major attractions of Yamunotri are hot water springs nearby. Devotees prepare rice and potatoes to offer at the shrine, by dipping them in these hot water springs, tied in muslin cloth.

The trek to Yamunotri is spectacular, dominated by a panorama of rugged peaks and dense forests.

From Rishikesh, a 213 kms. journey by road takes one to Hanumanchatti. From here, the remaining 13 kms. trek is covered on foot or on ponies. Palanquins and Porters are also available on hire.


Prime Pilgrimage Attractions
Yamunotri Temple
The main temple is dedicated to Goddess Yamuna. The present temple was built by Maharani Guleria of Jaipur in the late nineteenth century. Once destroyed by an earthquake, it has been rebuilt. A holy dip in the nearby tank filled by hot springs and cooking rice in its water are common rituals performed by the devotees.

Surya Kund
One of the important thermal springs known for its very high temperature of 190°F. Pilgrims cook rice and potatoes here to offer to the deity in the temple.

Divya Shila
A huge rock pillar venerated before entering the Yamunotri Temple.

Hanumanchatti
The confluence of Hanuman Ganga and Yamuna rivers forms the starting point for the scenic Dodi TaL Trek.

Sayanachatti
A scenic spot along the banks of river Yamuna that makes a lovely sight enroute the trek upto Yamunotri.

Chamba
A sylvan spot on way to Tehri that offers an excellent view of the Himalayan peaks. Situated at an altitude of 1,676 mts., Chamba is an ideal summer retreat.

Accessibility
Airport
Jolly Grant, 196 kms. from Yamunotri via Dehradun
Rail
Rishikesh, 213 kms. & Dehradun, 172 kms.
Road
Dharasu, 107 kms. Tehri, 149 kms. Rishikesh, 213 kms.& Dehradun, 172 kms

Source: http://www.pilgrimage-india.com/chardham/yamunotri.html

Bhagirathi River (Ganges)




The Bhāgīrathī is a turbulent Himalayan river in the state of Uttarakhand, India, that is the source stream of the Ganges—the major river of the Gangetic plain of Northern India and the holy river of Hinduism. The headwaters of the Bhagirathi are formed in the region of the Gangotri and Khatling glaciers in the Garhwal Himalaya. From its source, the river flows for about 700 km (435 mi) before meeting the Alaknanda river at an elevation of 475 m (1,558 ft) in the town of Devprayag. Downstream of this confluence, considered holy by Hindus, the river is known as the Ganga or Ganges. The controversial Tehri dam lies at the confluence of the Bhāgirathi and its tributary, the Bhilangna, near Tehri.

The mainstem, Bhagirathi, rises at Gaumukh (elevation 3,892 metres (12,769 feet)), at the foot of the Gangotri glacier which drains into it. It is then joined by its tributaries; these are, in sequence: the Kedar Ganga at Gangotri (elevation 3,049 m (10,003 ft)), the Jadh Ganga at Bhaironghati (elevation 2,650 m (8,694 ft)), the Kakora Gad and Jalandhari Gad near Harsil (elevation 2,745 m (9,006 ft)), the Siyan Gad near Jhala (elevation 2,575 m (8,448 ft)), the Asi Ganga near Uttarkashi (elevation 1,158 m (3,799 ft)), and finally the Bhilangna near Old Tehri (elevation 755 m (2,477 ft)). The Bhilangna itself rises at the foot of the Khatling Glacier (elevation 3,717 m (12,195 ft)) approximately 50 km (31 mi) south of Gaumukh.

Soruce: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bhagirathi_flowing_into_devprayag.jpg

Bhagirathi River (Ganges)




The Bhāgīrathī is a turbulent Himalayan river in the state of Uttarakhand, India, that is the source stream of the Ganges—the major river of the Gangetic plain of Northern India and the holy river of Hinduism. The headwaters of the Bhagirathi are formed in the region of the Gangotri and Khatling glaciers in the Garhwal Himalaya. From its source, the river flows for about 700 km (435 mi) before meeting the Alaknanda river at an elevation of 475 m (1,558 ft) in the town of Devprayag. Downstream of this confluence, considered holy by Hindus, the river is known as the Ganga or Ganges. The controversial Tehri dam lies at the confluence of the Bhāgirathi and its tributary, the Bhilangna, near Tehri.

The mainstem, Bhagirathi, rises at Gaumukh (elevation 3,892 metres (12,769 feet)), at the foot of the Gangotri glacier which drains into it. It is then joined by its tributaries; these are, in sequence: the Kedar Ganga at Gangotri (elevation 3,049 m (10,003 ft)), the Jadh Ganga at Bhaironghati (elevation 2,650 m (8,694 ft)), the Kakora Gad and Jalandhari Gad near Harsil (elevation 2,745 m (9,006 ft)), the Siyan Gad near Jhala (elevation 2,575 m (8,448 ft)), the Asi Ganga near Uttarkashi (elevation 1,158 m (3,799 ft)), and finally the Bhilangna near Old Tehri (elevation 755 m (2,477 ft)). The Bhilangna itself rises at the foot of the Khatling Glacier (elevation 3,717 m (12,195 ft)) approximately 50 km (31 mi) south of Gaumukh.

Soruce: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bhagirathi_flowing_into_devprayag.jpg

Gangotri


Gangotri is a town and a nagar panchayat in Uttarkashi district in the state of Uttarakhand, India. It is a Hindu pilgrim town on the banks of the river Bhagirathi. It is on the Greater Himalayan Range, at a height of 3,042 m.

Gangotri Temple
Gangotri templeGangotri, the source of the river Ganga and seat of the goddess Ganga, is one of the four sites in the Char Dham pilgrimage circuit. The river is called Bhagirathi at the source and acquires the name Ganga from Devprayag onwards where it meets the Alaknanda. The origin of the holy river is at Gaumukh, set in the Gangotri Glacier, and is a 19 km trek from Gangotri. Gangotri can be reached in one day's travel from Rishikesh, Haridwar or Dehradun, or in two days from Yamunotri, the first site in the Char Dham circuit. More popular and important than its sister site to the east, Gangotri is also accessible directly by car and bus, meaning that it sees many more pilgrims than Yamunotri.

This small town is centered around a temple of the goddess Ganga, which was built by the Gorkha General Amar Singh Thapa in the late 18th or early 19th century. The temple is closed on Diwali day every year and is reopened in May. During this time, the idol of the goddess is kept at Mukhba village, near Harsil.

Ritual duties are supervised by the Semwal family of pujaris. The aarti ceremony at the Gangotri is especially impressive, as is the temple, a stately affair that sits on the banks of the rushing Ganga. Adventurous pilgrims can make an overnight 18 km trek to Gaumukh, the actual current source of the river Ganga.


Bhagirathi River at GangotriFor a large number of tourists, Gangotri town serves as the starting point of the Gangotri-Gaumukh-Tapovan and Gangotri-Kedartal trekking routes.


According to Hindu mythology, Goddess Ganga - the daughter of heaven, took the form of a river to absolve the sins of King Bhagirath's predecessors, following his severe penance of several centuries. Lord Shiva received Ganga into his matted locks to minimize the impact of her fall.

According to this legend, King Sagar, after slaying the demons on earth decided to stage in Ashwamegh Yagya as a proclamation of his supremacy. The horse which was to be taken on an uninterrupted journey around the earth was to be accompanied by the King's 60,000 sons born to Queen Sumati and one son Asmanjas born of the second queen Kesani. Indra, supreme ruler of the gods feared that he might be deprived of his celestial throne if the 'Yagya' (worship with fire) succeeded and then took away the horse and tied it to the ashram of Sage Kapil, who was then in deep meditation. The sons of the King Sagar searched for the horse and finally found it tied near the meditating sage. Sixty thousand angry sons of King Sagar stormed the ashram of sage Kapil. When he opened his eyes, 60,000 sons had perished by the curse of sage Kapil. Bhagirath, grand son of King Sagar, is believed to have meditated to bring down the Ganga to cleanse the ashes of his ancestors and liberate their souls, granting them salvation or Moksha. The Bhagirathi 'Shila' is located near the temple of Ganga where the holy Ganga first descended on earth from heaven.

Bhavishya Badri Temple
Dense forests near Tapovan surround the Bhavishya Badri. The Bhavishya Badri is at a distance of about 17 km. east of Joshimath. Pilgrims trek beyond Tapovan up the Dhauliganga River to reach this holy spot. The idol of narsingha (the god with the head of lion) is enshrined here. Traditionally, it is believed that a day will come when the present route to the Badrinath will be inaccessible and the Lord Badrinath will be worshipped here and this is why the place is called Bhavishya Badri.

Soruce: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gangotri

Gangotri


Gangotri is a town and a nagar panchayat in Uttarkashi district in the state of Uttarakhand, India. It is a Hindu pilgrim town on the banks of the river Bhagirathi. It is on the Greater Himalayan Range, at a height of 3,042 m.

Gangotri Temple
Gangotri templeGangotri, the source of the river Ganga and seat of the goddess Ganga, is one of the four sites in the Char Dham pilgrimage circuit. The river is called Bhagirathi at the source and acquires the name Ganga from Devprayag onwards where it meets the Alaknanda. The origin of the holy river is at Gaumukh, set in the Gangotri Glacier, and is a 19 km trek from Gangotri. Gangotri can be reached in one day's travel from Rishikesh, Haridwar or Dehradun, or in two days from Yamunotri, the first site in the Char Dham circuit. More popular and important than its sister site to the east, Gangotri is also accessible directly by car and bus, meaning that it sees many more pilgrims than Yamunotri.

This small town is centered around a temple of the goddess Ganga, which was built by the Gorkha General Amar Singh Thapa in the late 18th or early 19th century. The temple is closed on Diwali day every year and is reopened in May. During this time, the idol of the goddess is kept at Mukhba village, near Harsil.

Ritual duties are supervised by the Semwal family of pujaris. The aarti ceremony at the Gangotri is especially impressive, as is the temple, a stately affair that sits on the banks of the rushing Ganga. Adventurous pilgrims can make an overnight 18 km trek to Gaumukh, the actual current source of the river Ganga.


Bhagirathi River at GangotriFor a large number of tourists, Gangotri town serves as the starting point of the Gangotri-Gaumukh-Tapovan and Gangotri-Kedartal trekking routes.


According to Hindu mythology, Goddess Ganga - the daughter of heaven, took the form of a river to absolve the sins of King Bhagirath's predecessors, following his severe penance of several centuries. Lord Shiva received Ganga into his matted locks to minimize the impact of her fall.

According to this legend, King Sagar, after slaying the demons on earth decided to stage in Ashwamegh Yagya as a proclamation of his supremacy. The horse which was to be taken on an uninterrupted journey around the earth was to be accompanied by the King's 60,000 sons born to Queen Sumati and one son Asmanjas born of the second queen Kesani. Indra, supreme ruler of the gods feared that he might be deprived of his celestial throne if the 'Yagya' (worship with fire) succeeded and then took away the horse and tied it to the ashram of Sage Kapil, who was then in deep meditation. The sons of the King Sagar searched for the horse and finally found it tied near the meditating sage. Sixty thousand angry sons of King Sagar stormed the ashram of sage Kapil. When he opened his eyes, 60,000 sons had perished by the curse of sage Kapil. Bhagirath, grand son of King Sagar, is believed to have meditated to bring down the Ganga to cleanse the ashes of his ancestors and liberate their souls, granting them salvation or Moksha. The Bhagirathi 'Shila' is located near the temple of Ganga where the holy Ganga first descended on earth from heaven.

Bhavishya Badri Temple
Dense forests near Tapovan surround the Bhavishya Badri. The Bhavishya Badri is at a distance of about 17 km. east of Joshimath. Pilgrims trek beyond Tapovan up the Dhauliganga River to reach this holy spot. The idol of narsingha (the god with the head of lion) is enshrined here. Traditionally, it is believed that a day will come when the present route to the Badrinath will be inaccessible and the Lord Badrinath will be worshipped here and this is why the place is called Bhavishya Badri.

Soruce: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gangotri

Gangotri




Gangotri
Location : Uttarakhand
Altitude : 3042 mts.
Climate : Summer - Cool during the day and cold at night.
Winter - Snow-bound. Touching sub-zero
Best Season : April to November

Gangotri - The Eternal Gift of Bhagirath's Penance

Be it man's urge to placate the Gods above or to quench his desire for adventure, Gangotri is an ideal location. Gangotri, the origin of the sacred river Ganges, attracts tourists in large numbers every year. The confrontation with the daunting rivers and attempts to unravel the mysteries of the supernatural world are ubiquitous sights here. Along with the thrill of conquering nature, what one experiences here is the mystical aura that India is so famous for.

Location
Couched in the magnificent Garhwal hills, Gangotri is at an altitude of 3048 meters above sea level. It is on the northernmost part of the state of Uttarakhand and is very near the Indo-Tibetan border. It is approximately 300 km from Dehradun, 250 km from Rishikesh and 105 km from Uttarkashi. The summers are relatively cool and winters are freezing cold, with rains in the months of May and June. For the devotees and tourists, the gates of the temple are open only in the months of May to November.

Mythological Legend
According to an old legend, Lord Shiva rewarded King Bhagirath after his penance and Ganga came down to earth. However, due to her pride, and the fact that the earth would be devastated if Ganga came down in her full force, Lord Shiva caught her in his locks. It was then proclaimed that Goddess Uma or Parvati, Shiva's consort, would bathe in the Ganges daily and only then would she descend on the earth. The sacred stone near the temple denotes the place where Ganga first came down to earth. This is why Ganga is also called by the name of Bhagirathi.
Unique Pilgrimage Attraction

Submerged Shivling
The natural rock Shivling, submerged in the river, is an amazing sight reinforcing the power of the divine. According to mythology, Lord Shiva sat at this spot to receive the Ganaga in his matted locks. The shivling is visible in the early winters when the water level goes down. The picturesque pilgrimage in the hinterlands of the Himalayas is the most sacred spot where Ganga, the stream of life, touched earth for the first time.

Mythological Mystery
According to mythology, Goddess Ganga- the daughter of heaven, manigested herself in the form of a river to absolve the sins of King Bhagirath's predecessors, following his severe penance of several centuries. Lord Shiva received into his matted locks to minimise the immense impact of her fall. She came to be called Bhagirathi at her legendary source.

A long the right bank of Bhagirathi stands the shrine of Gangotri dedicated to the Goddess. Perched at a height of 3042 mts., it was constructed in the early 18th century by a Gorkha Commander, Amar Singh Thapa. Every year, lakhs of pilgrims throng the sacred temple between May and October. By November, Gangotri is covered by snow. It is believed that the Goddess retreats to Mukhba, her winter abode.

Gangotri Temple
The 18th century's temple dedicated to Goddess Ganga is located near a sacred stone where King Bhagirath worshipped Lord Shiva. Ganga is believed to have touched earth at this spot. According to another legend, Pandavas performed the great 'Deva Yagna' here to atone the deaths of their kinsmen in the epic battle of Mahabharata. The temple is an exquisite 20 ft. High structure made of white granite.

Nandanvan Tapovan
An arduous trek along the Gangotri Glacier leads to scenic Nandanvan - the base camp for the Bhagirathi peaks, that offers a panoramic view of the surrounding Shivaling peak. A trek across the snout of the Gangotri Glacier leads to Tapovan known for its beautiful meadows that encircle the base of the Shivling Peak.

Uttarkashi (99 kms.)
An important pilgrimage centre, situated at an elevation of 1,150 mts. above sea level on the bank of river Bhagirathi. Some of the important temples worth visiting are - Vishwanath temple, Ekadash Rudra temple, Gyaneshwar temple and Kuteti Devi Temple. Nearby is the Nehru Institute of Mountaineering. Every year, during the 'Magh Mela' people visit Uttarkashi to take a holy dip in Bhagirathi along with the image of their village deity.

Kedar Tal (18 kms.)
An enhancing lake, 4425 mts. above sea level against the splendid backdrop of mighty Thalaiyasagar peak. Accessible through a rough mountain trail, it is the base camp for trekking to surrounding peaks. The trek to Kedartal needs a local guide.

Gaumukh( 18 kms.)
The snout of the Gangotri Glacier and the source of the Bhagirathi river. Pilgrims trek upto the sacred spot on foot or on ponies to take a holy dip in the ice-cold water.

Dayara Bugyal (93 kms.)

A breathtakingly beautiful meadow, situated at a height of 3,048 mts. above sea level. A motorable road connects Bhatwari (27 kms. from Uttarkashi) with Raithal village, from where follows a 6 kms. long trek to Dayara. The famous Sheshnag Temple enroute is an attraction of the trek. From Dayara, one can also trek down to Dodi Tal (30 kms.). During winters, Dayara provides excellent ski slopes over an area of 28 sq.kms.

Nachiketa Tal (131 kms.)
A pleasant trek through lush green forests leads to this peaceful retreat. A small temple along the lake and lovely surroundings are an attraction.

New Tehri (173 kms.)
Lying at the confluence of Bhagirathi and Bhilangna rivers is the former capital of Tehri Garhwal principality. It is the site of a giant hydel project.

Narendranagar (239 kms.)
The new capital of erstwhile Tehri state, offers a magnificent view of the Ganga valley of Rishikesh and the plains of Har

Accessibility
Airport
Jolly Grant, Dehradun 226 kms.

Rail
Rishikesh, 249 kms.
Road
Well connected to Rishikesh, Haridwar, Dehradun and Delhi.

Source: http://www.pilgrimage-india.com/chardham/gangotri.html

Gangotri




Gangotri
Location : Uttarakhand
Altitude : 3042 mts.
Climate : Summer - Cool during the day and cold at night.
Winter - Snow-bound. Touching sub-zero
Best Season : April to November

Gangotri - The Eternal Gift of Bhagirath's Penance

Be it man's urge to placate the Gods above or to quench his desire for adventure, Gangotri is an ideal location. Gangotri, the origin of the sacred river Ganges, attracts tourists in large numbers every year. The confrontation with the daunting rivers and attempts to unravel the mysteries of the supernatural world are ubiquitous sights here. Along with the thrill of conquering nature, what one experiences here is the mystical aura that India is so famous for.

Location
Couched in the magnificent Garhwal hills, Gangotri is at an altitude of 3048 meters above sea level. It is on the northernmost part of the state of Uttarakhand and is very near the Indo-Tibetan border. It is approximately 300 km from Dehradun, 250 km from Rishikesh and 105 km from Uttarkashi. The summers are relatively cool and winters are freezing cold, with rains in the months of May and June. For the devotees and tourists, the gates of the temple are open only in the months of May to November.

Mythological Legend
According to an old legend, Lord Shiva rewarded King Bhagirath after his penance and Ganga came down to earth. However, due to her pride, and the fact that the earth would be devastated if Ganga came down in her full force, Lord Shiva caught her in his locks. It was then proclaimed that Goddess Uma or Parvati, Shiva's consort, would bathe in the Ganges daily and only then would she descend on the earth. The sacred stone near the temple denotes the place where Ganga first came down to earth. This is why Ganga is also called by the name of Bhagirathi.
Unique Pilgrimage Attraction

Submerged Shivling
The natural rock Shivling, submerged in the river, is an amazing sight reinforcing the power of the divine. According to mythology, Lord Shiva sat at this spot to receive the Ganaga in his matted locks. The shivling is visible in the early winters when the water level goes down. The picturesque pilgrimage in the hinterlands of the Himalayas is the most sacred spot where Ganga, the stream of life, touched earth for the first time.

Mythological Mystery
According to mythology, Goddess Ganga- the daughter of heaven, manigested herself in the form of a river to absolve the sins of King Bhagirath's predecessors, following his severe penance of several centuries. Lord Shiva received into his matted locks to minimise the immense impact of her fall. She came to be called Bhagirathi at her legendary source.

A long the right bank of Bhagirathi stands the shrine of Gangotri dedicated to the Goddess. Perched at a height of 3042 mts., it was constructed in the early 18th century by a Gorkha Commander, Amar Singh Thapa. Every year, lakhs of pilgrims throng the sacred temple between May and October. By November, Gangotri is covered by snow. It is believed that the Goddess retreats to Mukhba, her winter abode.

Gangotri Temple
The 18th century's temple dedicated to Goddess Ganga is located near a sacred stone where King Bhagirath worshipped Lord Shiva. Ganga is believed to have touched earth at this spot. According to another legend, Pandavas performed the great 'Deva Yagna' here to atone the deaths of their kinsmen in the epic battle of Mahabharata. The temple is an exquisite 20 ft. High structure made of white granite.

Nandanvan Tapovan
An arduous trek along the Gangotri Glacier leads to scenic Nandanvan - the base camp for the Bhagirathi peaks, that offers a panoramic view of the surrounding Shivaling peak. A trek across the snout of the Gangotri Glacier leads to Tapovan known for its beautiful meadows that encircle the base of the Shivling Peak.

Uttarkashi (99 kms.)
An important pilgrimage centre, situated at an elevation of 1,150 mts. above sea level on the bank of river Bhagirathi. Some of the important temples worth visiting are - Vishwanath temple, Ekadash Rudra temple, Gyaneshwar temple and Kuteti Devi Temple. Nearby is the Nehru Institute of Mountaineering. Every year, during the 'Magh Mela' people visit Uttarkashi to take a holy dip in Bhagirathi along with the image of their village deity.

Kedar Tal (18 kms.)
An enhancing lake, 4425 mts. above sea level against the splendid backdrop of mighty Thalaiyasagar peak. Accessible through a rough mountain trail, it is the base camp for trekking to surrounding peaks. The trek to Kedartal needs a local guide.

Gaumukh( 18 kms.)
The snout of the Gangotri Glacier and the source of the Bhagirathi river. Pilgrims trek upto the sacred spot on foot or on ponies to take a holy dip in the ice-cold water.

Dayara Bugyal (93 kms.)

A breathtakingly beautiful meadow, situated at a height of 3,048 mts. above sea level. A motorable road connects Bhatwari (27 kms. from Uttarkashi) with Raithal village, from where follows a 6 kms. long trek to Dayara. The famous Sheshnag Temple enroute is an attraction of the trek. From Dayara, one can also trek down to Dodi Tal (30 kms.). During winters, Dayara provides excellent ski slopes over an area of 28 sq.kms.

Nachiketa Tal (131 kms.)
A pleasant trek through lush green forests leads to this peaceful retreat. A small temple along the lake and lovely surroundings are an attraction.

New Tehri (173 kms.)
Lying at the confluence of Bhagirathi and Bhilangna rivers is the former capital of Tehri Garhwal principality. It is the site of a giant hydel project.

Narendranagar (239 kms.)
The new capital of erstwhile Tehri state, offers a magnificent view of the Ganga valley of Rishikesh and the plains of Har

Accessibility
Airport
Jolly Grant, Dehradun 226 kms.

Rail
Rishikesh, 249 kms.
Road
Well connected to Rishikesh, Haridwar, Dehradun and Delhi.

Source: http://www.pilgrimage-india.com/chardham/gangotri.html

Uttarakhand seeks two helicopters and 30 sat phones for LS polls

Dehradun , Feb 11 In view of rising Maoist activities and a tough terrain, Uttarakhand government has sought two helicopters, 30 satellite phones besides 70 companies of paramilitary forces from the Centre for the upcoming Lok Sabha elections.

"Due to the hilly terrain of Uttarakhand and its long borderline with Nepal and China, it is very difficult to keep a watch on the poll process by roads,"state Director General of Police (DGP) Subhash Joshi told PTI.

Several areas of the hill state are inaccessible and they even do not have any communication links."So we have urged the cetre to provide at least two helicopters and 30 satellite phones,"he said.

Joshi said since last assembly elections in 2007, the state has become more sensitive due to the"political changes"in Nepal with which Uttarakhand shares a 300-km long border.

He noted that Kumaon region of the state has witnessed an increase in Maoist activities during the past few months.

Apart from this, Muzaffarnagar, Saharanpur, Bijnore and other western districts of neighbouring Uttar Pradesh have also recorded increased in Naxal activities, he said.

Source: http://www.indopia.in/India-usa-uk-news/latest-news/499958/National/1/20/1

Uttarakhand seeks two helicopters and 30 sat phones for LS polls

Dehradun , Feb 11 In view of rising Maoist activities and a tough terrain, Uttarakhand government has sought two helicopters, 30 satellite phones besides 70 companies of paramilitary forces from the Centre for the upcoming Lok Sabha elections.

"Due to the hilly terrain of Uttarakhand and its long borderline with Nepal and China, it is very difficult to keep a watch on the poll process by roads,"state Director General of Police (DGP) Subhash Joshi told PTI.

Several areas of the hill state are inaccessible and they even do not have any communication links."So we have urged the cetre to provide at least two helicopters and 30 satellite phones,"he said.

Joshi said since last assembly elections in 2007, the state has become more sensitive due to the"political changes"in Nepal with which Uttarakhand shares a 300-km long border.

He noted that Kumaon region of the state has witnessed an increase in Maoist activities during the past few months.

Apart from this, Muzaffarnagar, Saharanpur, Bijnore and other western districts of neighbouring Uttar Pradesh have also recorded increased in Naxal activities, he said.

Source: http://www.indopia.in/India-usa-uk-news/latest-news/499958/National/1/20/1

Runaway tiger from Corbett finally caught

NEW DELHI: The tiger, which strayed from Corbett park and killed a woman, has finally been caught by Uttarakhand Forest officials.

The big cat, which was recently declared a man-eater, was tranquilized with a gun and caged last night in forests of Faizabad, an official in the rescue team said.

It will be initially rehabilitated at Nanital Zoo and the next course of action will depend on its behaviour.

After the animal was declared man-eater, the officials had prohibited the entry of humans in the forest and a rescue team comprising wildlife experts, shooters and veterinarians had been camping there to tranquilize and cage the tiger.

The big cat had strayed into Dhikuli village from the Park a month ago and last week killed a 50-year-old woman. It later attacked two motorcycle-borne youth.

Following pressure from the villagers, the officials had declared the striped animal a man-eater, a decision which, however, did not go down well with the National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA).

The Authority had asked the officials to declare it a man-eater only after scientifically establishing the animal's behaviour.

Pointing out the difference in the guidelines under the NTCA to deal between a 'man-killer' and 'man-eater', the official observed that "a tiger can only be called a man-eater if it regularly kills humans."

Source: http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/Flora__Fauna/Runaway_tiger_from_Corbett_finally_caught/articleshow/4112855.cms

Ghaziabad students killed while trekking in Uttarakhand

Ghaziabad, Feb 11 (IANS) Two students of city-based institute were killed Wednesday when they fell into a deep gorge while trekking in Uttarakhand during a class trip, a college official said.

‘On Tuesday morning a group of 84 students of B.Sc. (Bio-Tech) of Institute of Management Studies (IMS) along with four faculty members went to Dynasty Resort on a class trip. Today (Wednesday) noon, I received a call from Nainital that two students slipped to a deep gorge while they were trekking,’ said the IMS Director R.K. Bhardwaj.

The director identified the two students as Kanika and Priyanka. He also said that the weather was bad and a group of students had ventured out without informing the accompanying faculty members.

The IMS is owned by Uttar Pradesh politician and former minister Naresh Agrawal

Source: http://www.sindhtoday.net/south-asia/62386.htm